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Getting a little tired of your BlackBerry and looking for a change to Android? You've got questions, we know. How smooth will the switch be? How do you move your contacts and e-mails? Can you find all the apps you need? Will the change be hard to adapt to?

Just a few months ago, I was in the same boat, getting bored with my BlackBerry Storm 2 (which was not my first BlackBerry). And after talking to friends who grabbed the Motorola Droid, I began to research Android for myself. Immediately, I jumped into the Android Central forums .

Let’s take some time to go over the conversion process, what you will need to know if you're coming over from BlackBerry, and some other information to help make the transition an extremely smooth process.

Bb bold 9000 trackball not working

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Getting a little tired of your BlackBerry and looking for a change to Android? You've got questions, we know. How smooth will the switch be? How do you move your contacts and e-mails? Can you find all the apps you need? Will the change be hard to adapt to?

Just a few months ago, I was in the same boat, getting bored with my BlackBerry Storm 2 (which was not my first BlackBerry). And after talking to friends who grabbed the Motorola Droid, I began to research Android for myself. Immediately, I jumped into the Android Central forums .

Let’s take some time to go over the conversion process, what you will need to know if you're coming over from BlackBerry, and some other information to help make the transition an extremely smooth process.

BlackBerry is a line of smartphones and services designed and marketed by Canadian company BlackBerry Limited (formerly known as Research In Motion Limited). [1]

BlackBerry was considered one of the most prominent smartphone vendors in the world, specializing in secure communications and mobile productivity. At its peak in September 2013, there were 85 million BlackBerry subscribers worldwide. [2] [3] However, BlackBerry has since lost its dominant position in the market due to the success of the Android and iOS platforms; the same numbers had fallen to 23 million in March 2016. [4]

The BlackBerry line traditionally uses a proprietary operating system developed by BlackBerry Limited known as BlackBerry OS . In 2013, BlackBerry introduced BlackBerry 10 , a major revamp of the platform based on QNX operating system. BlackBerry 10 was meant to replace the aging BlackBerry OS platform with a new system that was more in line with the user experiences of modern smartphone operating systems. The first BB10 powered device was the BlackBerry Z10 , which was followed by other all-touch and keyboard-equipped models; including the BlackBerry Q10 , BlackBerry Classic , BlackBerry Passport , and the BlackBerry Leap .

I remember a conversation I had with the guys from RIM back in 2006 at the launch of the BlackBerry 7130g . I said that the company's insistence on creating devices targeted only at the corporate market was self defeating. I told them that there are many consumers out there who would want to receive their email straight to their pocket, but wouldn't want a device that's so light on features. RIM insisted that it would not make a BlackBerry with a camera or Bluetooth file sharing, since big, paranoid, corporate clients wouldn't want those features. Oh, how things have changed.

It's probably fair to say that the real turning point when it comes to consumer friendly BlackBerry handsets was the introduction of the BlackBerry Pearl , which came around six months after the above conversation. Of course I'm not going to take credit for RIM's movement into the consumer space, since the company clearly had the Pearl on its roadmap before I spoke to them, but what surprised me was how development seemed to stall for so long after the launch of the Pearl. However, it's clear that the bods at RIM have been beavering away in their labs, because the company recently launched its most powerful and consumer friendly BlackBerry yet, the Bold.

Although the Bold has been available for a while off contract, most BlackBerry users are more likely to upgrade through their network operator. As such, I'm looking at the Vodafone version of the Bold, which is available on a plethora of price plans. For the sake of this review though, I'll be working with the £39.99 (inc. VAT) contract, which gets you unlimited email, data and calls to landlines, as well as 700 minutes and 250 texts - a pretty comprehensive package then. On this package the handset itself is free.