Sticky header css android jquery mobile

 

The purpose of a sticky footer is that it "sticks" to the bottom of the browser window. But not always, if there is enough content on the page to push the footer lower, it still does that. But if the content on the page is short, a sticky footer will still hang to the bottom of the browser window.

There was a wrapping element that held everything except the footer. It had a negative margin equal to the height of the footer. That was the basis of this one .

This one required an extra element inside the content area (the " .push "), to ensure that the negative margin didn't pull the footer up and cover any content. The push was also clever because it very likely didn't have any bottom margin of it's own. If it did, that would have to be factored into the negative margins, and having those two numbers not in sync doesn't look quite as nice.

Sticky header css android jquery mobile

I recently came across Philip Walton's excellent ”Solved by Flexbox” site, where he shows some good examples of using flexbox to create common layout patterns, some of which have been really tricky to solve with CSS until now. Since there's multiple versions of the flexbox syntax , the examples on Philip's site are (quite sensibly) only focusing on the latest, more stable version. When I tried out the example for ”sticky footer” with all of the different versions of the flexbox syntax, I found that it didn't work in IE10. This post explores how to fix that, as well as make it work in all other browsers that support old and new flexbox syntax.

"Sticky footer" is a pattern where we want the footer to stay at the bottom of the visible page unless the content of the page is tall enough to push it down. Expressed in a different way, we want our "main content" to always be at least tall enough to push the footer down to "stick" to the bottom of the screen. Previously, we needed either some rather unnecessary extra elements and weird nesting to achieve that, or possibly using table display properties on top-level items in your markup, which feels icky. Flexbox makes it easier.

First, we assume a very straight-forward markup inside our <html> document, <head> and <html> elements omitted for brevity:

The purpose of a sticky footer is that it "sticks" to the bottom of the browser window. But not always, if there is enough content on the page to push the footer lower, it still does that. But if the content on the page is short, a sticky footer will still hang to the bottom of the browser window.

There was a wrapping element that held everything except the footer. It had a negative margin equal to the height of the footer. That was the basis of this one .

This one required an extra element inside the content area (the " .push "), to ensure that the negative margin didn't pull the footer up and cover any content. The push was also clever because it very likely didn't have any bottom margin of it's own. If it did, that would have to be factored into the negative margins, and having those two numbers not in sync doesn't look quite as nice.

Content is king when it comes to website traffic, however if your site doesn't show well then you could be losing some of your audience or even business prospects.   When I visit a website and see a fixed item done correctly it usually stands out and my impression meter of the site automatically goes up even before I read the content.  Are you doing something to standout?

In this post we will run through how you can add a css fixed header to your site and gain a visual distinction.   With less that 10% of all internet sites using fixed assets correctly, you can set yourself apart and allow your sites to have a different more elegant flow.

The first thing to do is locate your target element(s) you want to set as fixed.  This is very easy with a DOM inspector like Google Chrome or Firebug.   To see how this is done visit the post  Fast Website Layouts .  Once you have located the items place them inside a div element with an id such as: