Iphone health monitoring

 

In our video review, we take a close look at the AliveCor heart monitor’s features and real life functionality.  In the text portion of this review, we explain what the device can and cannot do — and attempt to bring clarity to this mobile heart monitor’s capabilities.  For example, we touch on how the device does not replace a 12 lead ECG and will miss heart attacks — an impression the general media appears to think is not the case and something the device makers never touted the device can do in the first place.  Overall, we walked away impressed with the elegance and simplicity of the device.

A potential use of the AliveCor heart monitor is as a non-continuous, patient-triggered event monitor. It’s not hard to imagine a patient walking into clinic for palpitations and walking out with one of these devices. The form factor of the device could help drive patient adoption.

This does not mean every patient should get one of these devices. As noted in a 2010 review of ambulatory arrhythmia monitoring in Circulation, these types of event monitors (which have been around for some time) have limitations. For example, they will not catch the initiation of an arrhythmia, which has diagnostic value. They will also miss short arrhythmias.

Iphone health monitoring

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We’ve selected these apps based on their user reviews, frequent updates, and overall impact in supporting people living with diabetes. If you’d like to suggest an app for this list, email us at [email protected] .

Millions of Americans are living with diabetes — nearly 30 million to be exact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . That’s almost 10 percent of the population.

In our video review, we take a close look at the AliveCor heart monitor’s features and real life functionality.  In the text portion of this review, we explain what the device can and cannot do — and attempt to bring clarity to this mobile heart monitor’s capabilities.  For example, we touch on how the device does not replace a 12 lead ECG and will miss heart attacks — an impression the general media appears to think is not the case and something the device makers never touted the device can do in the first place.  Overall, we walked away impressed with the elegance and simplicity of the device.

A potential use of the AliveCor heart monitor is as a non-continuous, patient-triggered event monitor. It’s not hard to imagine a patient walking into clinic for palpitations and walking out with one of these devices. The form factor of the device could help drive patient adoption.

This does not mean every patient should get one of these devices. As noted in a 2010 review of ambulatory arrhythmia monitoring in Circulation, these types of event monitors (which have been around for some time) have limitations. For example, they will not catch the initiation of an arrhythmia, which has diagnostic value. They will also miss short arrhythmias.

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As the tech savvy community that we are, we spend most of our time working in front of our computers and mobile devices. As a result, we often let our health take the back seat, never really finding the time to go to the gym or a fitness class and more often than not choosing fast food over much healthier options.

This is especially true for workaholic freelancers who sometimes work longer hours than their office-bound counterparts. The good news is if all you need is some help with record-keeping or to keep track of your progress, you can actually find iOS apps that can help you do that.

Workout Trainer provides many different routines (with step-by-step audio) for weight loss, yoga or weightlifting. If you’re undecided, try Shakerciser, all while staying connected with the fitness community. [Free]